Things You Don’t Need To Know About Wine To Enjoy It

posted by Aaron Zytle - 

You can enjoy watching TV without understanding how the television works and you don’t really need to understand a lot about wine to like drinking it. Let the pros debate which wine is the best in the world and discuss what the weather was like back in 2011 and how that affects those wines. This expert advice tells you all the things about wine you can disregard and still enjoy a glass of wine.

Critic Scores - Leave that 100-point scale to the wine critics. Wine is subjective and unless you’re tasting thousands of bottles a year like professional critics, your palate won’t match theirs. Instead, winemakerGabrielle Shaffer of Napa’s Gamling & McDuck advises trusting your palate and making notes about wines you like to find others from that region or producer.

Worrying about sulfites - These preservatives get blamed for causing headaches and hangovers, but despite what you’ve heard, there’s no need to avoid sulfites or wine. They’re a naturally occurring chemical in wine, as well as orange juice, cured meats, dried fruits, and canned soup, so that headache is probably from dehydration or having an extra glass or two.

The winemaker - You don’t need to know who made the wine to like it, it’s kind of like knowing the chef who’s cooking your dinner. Not knowing won’t change how much you enjoy your glass of vino.

The vintage - These days they just don’t matter as much with modern technology and climate control. As sommelier James Sligh explains, “Great farmers and winemakers will make good wine even in challenging years.”

Mass-market Tasting Notes - Those little signs on wine displays are called “shelf talkers” in the biz, and they’re supposed to give a preview of what the wine tastes like. But as Talitha Whidbee, owner of Vine Wine in Brooklyn, explains, “If they’re written by a human with a clear voice, they’re great. If they’re written by a corporation or publication, then they’re pretty much useless.”

Source: Huffington Post

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